Wednesday, July 11, 2018

"Adrift" Less Adrift

When I was cutting out leaves from a batik fabric to add to "Float", I was reminded that one of the reasons I abandoned work on "Adrift" was not just the unproductive dithering I'd been doing on leaf and grass placements, but also the realization that I would need to fuse more batiks together and cut out more leaves from them. That may sound like a silly little reason, but the fussy cutting already had taken its toll and I found I couldn't face fusing and cutting out more. But the leaf cutting for "Float" was going so well, so easily, the placement of leaves also, that it gave me renewed energy and confidence for completing "Adrift" at last. In the time since I'd last had it out (over 2 years ago), I'd also been keeping an eye out for branch placement in other artwork and photos, setting aside both photos on-line and in my own reference files as well as ones in magazines and books on hand. By the time I opened it out to work on it last week, I had a better idea in my head of how the branches formed from leaves should be placed and angled. Lots of rearranging and additional leaves cut and added got me to a point where I could say, "good enough; it doesn't have to be 100% accurate." I'd also been mulling forever how those leaves would be attached and couldn't come up with a workable way to stitch them down. In another rare for me "I don't care" moment, I simply glued them in place with Fabri-Tac, an adhesive I've used often and which has never failed me. The leaves were always meant to have the edges free so just a dab of glue in the center and along stems was all that was needed. The old me would be appalled at this, I admitted to myself; the older, tireder, and less rigid me was glad for the quick and easy application.


Once that was done, it was easier to see how the various yarns for the grasses needed to be laid out, how far up on the right and how much of a slant as they progress across the bottom. I'd spent a fair amount of time trying to figure out how best to attach them too when it dawned on me I could hand couch them. It gives me the control I need and the option of how much if any of the couched thread I wish to leave exposed, and I can quickly change from one color to the next as I work my way across. When I took this photo, the yarns were just clinging to the top naturally, but I could see that wouldn't do for long. Back to gluing, this time with Roxanne's Glue baste in a few spots along each strand, enough to hold everything in place until I can couch it down. All these processes are slow ones, but I don't mind. As long as I keep working steadily, I will make the exhibit deadline a short week away.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Your color palette is one I choose often. I like to use aqua, red & yellow together & that piece really speaks to me. Thanks for sharing your process! Jan in WY

The Inside Stori said...

Such a great solution!!!

Chris said...

Good for you! This looks like a great solution. Can’t wait to see the entire quilt.

Charlton Stitcher said...

Thanks very much for these links, Sheila. Both Fabric tac and Roxanne’s fabric baste are new to me - and, I discover by googling, available here in the UK. I have always shied away from gluing in my pieces because I felt it would show in some way but these look very worth a try. I think the fabric baste will be especially useful. I learn so much by reading other people’s blogs!