Saturday, May 16, 2009

Browne's Addition Tour - Bricks & Gingerbread

One last look at the architecture in Historic Browne's Addition, this time strictly from a design perspective that might cross over into my own art, and yours too. As always, click on any picture for a larger view.

Under my feet - cobblestone streets peaking through, brick paths in different configurations.




And when my eyes looked up, brickwork and details only necessary to please the eye.




Slightly skewed and sagging carriage house doors, well worn.


These steps to nowhere...this is behind & below the museum, but once must have led to a fine house. Or perhaps a shortcut between houses for impatient children, or the beginnings of a path into a wooded retreat.



Speaking of fine old houses, so many of them exhibit "gingerbread" trim. Note the similarity between the sunburst's rays over the porch and the swirls in the trim below. This was a bit unexpected that seemed to say of the designer, I don't have to do this like everyone else.



And last but not least, a bit of nature's "architecture." I was so intent on capturing details of one of the houses, that I nearly missed the fact that I was standing right next to this highly textured tree. It was quite large (the fence you just see in the pic is about 4 or 5 ft tall) and the bark texture equally large, unlike the finer texturing I'm used to seeing. Deep grooves, shadows and light, lines intersecting at all angles. It begs to be drawn.



2 comments:

Linda said...

It's been interesting, taking this tour with you and your last post has been a surprise to me.

I find architecturla detail inspiring - strong geometry, regular pattern and clean crisp lines always appeal to me. So why is it, of all the photos you've shown, that the crumbling 'steps to nowhere' appeal most?

The Idaho Beauty said...

I know - I'm the same way as evidenced by my grid series. No mystery there, in the regular shapes and spacings. But these steps? They pose so many questions and show obvious age - maybe that's why they caught my eye. They were a surprise to stumble upon and a mystery to why they were there and put together this way. Glad you enjoyed the tour.